23 Comments

Reminds me of when i was a kid. My cousin had the county agent come by their farm to help castrate a young bull. He told me to sit on his head while he held his back end. The rope was tied to a fence post to help hold him. When the ag agent applied the crimps the bull threw me up in the air about 6 feet and broke the fence post. But the agent was swift and got the job done before "all hell broke loose" and we accomplished the deed. My cousin was flat on his back, too. Made me remember one thing, don't lie down when the "man" comes around or you might lose your interest in women! These folks who are wanting to run the country are beginning to make me think they want me to lie down. Just sayin'

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I love these stories. It is nice to get away from the technical and negative now and then.

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Mar 21, 2023Liked by Joel Bowman

I was always disappointed when the Daily Reckoning no longer featured the voice of Bill Bonner, so when I had the opportunity for the return of his wit I jumped at it. Always enjoy his weekly missives, wisdom and insights. Riches are connections. Keep having fun.

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That chart and the few paragraphs after are a vivid picture of the destruction of a onetime free, industrious people that created a great nation. (Without experts)

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Love your stories!

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Love the reports on your ranch. Did you find out what was killing the calves?

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I noticed the saddle one of your gauchos was using. Tell us about the common saddle in Argentina vs. the kind that you use Bill. thought there might be a difference from Texas style.

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Maybe ChatGPT could give a hand with the economy. I read that AI is coming up with novel ideas to cure cancer. Gradually we could replace politicians with AI, perhaps. I'm glad you had your wits to escape from the horned one. Life's a gas.

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IDear Bill, I was under the impression that you were a laissez-faire type of guy until I read this wonderful account ofl intervention in guiding natures course which could have led to physical harm to you and the hapless cow. Maggots in a wound are natural and natures way of cleaning up the dead tissue. The larvae liquify the dead tissue through enzymes they secrete which enables them to ingest the liquid and kill the bacteria in their gut. They are wonderful little surgeons sometimes in the employ of the medical team who purposefully introduce them to cleanup sloughing wounds.

Just as governments should stay out of the way of the market sometimes it is better for all to sit on one's hands and watch. Britaisn's NHS has a little article on maggot therapy.

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Great story Bill. Today I got a note from TD Ameritrade on May 26th my account will transfer to Schwab Bank Sweep account. They said LIQUIDATE if you don't like it. I feel like i'm the Jack-donkey-butt on a cattle drive. Like Don Harrell said i better not lay on my back. In the end only six big banks and we're not in control of our own cattle drive anymore. Not good

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It was discovered a few tens of years ago that maggots in a wound are healthy. They eat all the bad stuff leaving only healthy flesh, and the wound gradually heals. Naturally, the maggots they use are bred in a sterile environment, people would be too shocked otherwise, but it probably doesn't make much difference!

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Bill, what a great story. I had a similar experience except it was the branding of the cattle and giving them some sort of injection. I don't think I want to do that again. I felt too sorry for the cattle.

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Awesome writings

I especially enjoy the stories about Ireland and life in Argentina

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The chart is from a 2017 article. Is there an updated version?

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Vaccinations for (or against) what exactly????

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Donald Anderson March 25, 2023.

I have been around lot of mad cows in my life. I am retired now at 81, but ranched in Wyoming most of my life. We used our horses to handle problems like the one you were having. We also trailed our cattle 65-75 miles depending on which pasture we were going into. Out to the Grazing Association pastures. It usually to 4 days but if were ran in to a lot of rain it could take 2 more days. The last 10-15 miles were on dirt roads. Well maybe calling them roads is a little to much. A couple times we had to trail them horse back all the way from the gravel to the pasture and then ride back all the way to the gravel where we could load the horses in trailers and head back home the ranch. Those were the good old days. Now the roads are better and the cattle are loaded on to big trucks and hauled all the way. It took time then but I remember the old days with fond memories.

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